ATKGrowing up in New England I was fascinated with stories of the American Revolution when I was a kid. I loved the stories of the ragtag minutemen militia battling against the formal, well-trained British regulars – the Red Coats.

At some point as I got older, I started admiring the British soldiers, if not the King and what they were fighting for. I did not really know why I admired them, other than my general anglophile tendencies. However, having read the wonderful book, All the King’s Men: The British Soldier from the Restoration to Waterloo by Saul David, I now have some idea. It turns out, despite the politics, the average British soldier, the Red Coat, at the height of the Empire, led quite an amazing life.

About All the King’s Men: “The British Soldier from the Restoration to Waterloo by Saul David: “In the tradition of Richard Holmes’ Redcoat and for readers of Max Hastings, Antony Beevor and Andrew Roberts, Saul David’s All the King’s Men: The British Soldier from the Restoration to Waterloo is a thrilling history of the British soldier from Charles II to Waterloo, when Britain became the military superpower of the day. Between 1660 and 1815 British supremacy on foreign soil was near total. Central to this success was the humble redcoat soldier who showed heroism in battle and stoicism in peace, despite appalling treatment. This is their story: of brutal discipline and inedible food, of loyalty and low pay, of barracks and battlefield – of victory, defeat, life and death.”

Thanks to authors and historians like Mr. David, and books like All the King’s Men: The British Soldier from the Restoration to Waterloo, we are able to read about the regular people and stories behind the famous leaders and major events of history and have a better understanding of who really made it all happen.

All the King’s Men: The British Soldier from the Restoration to Waterloo by Saul David is available from Amazon and other fine retailers.