GCTI have often mentioned my penchant for reading books about icons of the last century. Most of the time the “icon” is a person, but there are inanimate subjects that are just as iconic and fascinating, like the subject of today’s book, New York’s Grand Central Terminal.

Grand Central Terminal 100 Years of a New York Landmark is a wonderful book about the iconic transit temple produced by the New York Transit Museum and author Anthony W. Robins. There are a million stories that begin and end in the grand building that is Grand Central Terminal, but few are as interesting – and as photogenic – as the building itself.

About Grand Central Terminal 100 Years of a New York Landmark from the New York Transit Museum: “Opened in February 1913, Grand Central Terminal—one of the country’s great architectural monuments—helped create Midtown Manhattan. Over the next century, it evolved into an unofficial town square for New York. Today, it sits astride Park Avenue at 42nd Street in all its original splendor, attracting visitors by the thousands. This new book celebrates Grand Central’s Centennial by tracing the Terminal’s history and design, and showcasing 200 photographs of its wonders—from the well-trodden Main Concourse to its massive power station hidden 10 stories below. The stunning photographs, some archival and some taken by Frank English, official photographer of Metro-North Railroad for more than 25 years, capture every corner of this astonishing complex.”

This book is a fitting tribute to a building from another era that continues to thrive a hundred years on as a bustling center of one of the greatest cities on earth.

Grand Central Terminal 100 Years of a New York Landmark from the New York Transit Museum is available from Amazon and other fine book retailers.